Artful Healing

March 2nd to April 20th, 2023

Online Via Zoom

10:30am - 12:00pm, Thursdays

An 8-weeks creative arts online program for adults 40 years and over in their 5+ years of recovery from Acquired Brain Injury (ABI).

Have you been diagnosed with traumatic brain injury 5 years ago? Would you like to share with others who are on, or who have been on a similar journey?

Are you looking for a complementary method of self-care using visual arts?

Research and increasing evidence shows that making art can activate reward pathways in the brain, reduce stress, lower anxiety levels and improve mood.

Using creative expression we will share our stories together using symbol and image, while playfully exploring with watercolour, ink and collage. The goal is not to create a masterpiece but to experience the healing power of creative expression.

No Art experience required. Supplies will be provided.

Limited to max 4 participants
Register Here
Deadline to register: February 10th, 2023

For more information email Maurina at: hello@artofadapting.com

Art of Adapting respectfully acknowledges the traditional territory of the T’Sou-ke First Nations, upon whose land we practise the healing process of art making.

© Art of Adapting 2024. All Rights Reserved.

Natural Transformations by Maurina Joaquin

Art Exhibition Dates: April 22nd to July 19th, 2022

Exhibition Location: theDock: Centre for Social Impact 300-722 Cormorant St. Victoria, BC

Hours: 8:30am - 5:00pm, Monday to Friday

Natural Transformations by Maurina Joaquin is an exhibition that explores the experience of trauma, brain injury and disability, as well as the layers involved in the healing process.

 

Maurina is a Sooke-based artist and has been exhibiting artwork since 2019 in Sooke and Victoria, with her practice focusing on themes of disability and healing from trauma through creativity.

 

In this series of work, Maurina uses various printmaking techniques, including Suminagashi, monotype and collograph printing, as well as embossing and collage, to create fifteen layered compositions that will be on display at theDock: Centre for Social Impact in downtown Victoria from April to July.

 

theDock is home to one of many satellite galleries operated by the Victoria Arts Council, a non-profit organization that has connected artists and communities since its inception in 1968.

 

“We are thrilled to be working with Maurina to bring this unique multifaceted exhibition to the public. Natural Transformations is exciting because it has the potential to affect many people as it brings awareness to brain injury,” said Leah McInnis, Outreach Coordinator at the Victoria Arts Council.

 

“I was drawn to Suminagashi printmaking as a way to cope with Post-traumatic stress disorder, from a near drowning in 2010 that resulted in brain injury,” Maurina explains. “Suminagashi is an ancient Japanese process that involves floating ink on the surface of water

to create marbled effects on paper, and using this technique has helped me heal my relationship with water.”

 

Creative Journaling Kits will be available at theDock during the exhibition, and were created by Maurina as an invitation for the public to engage in their own art-making practice, as an extension of the exhibition. These kits are free and include various materials with simple instructions for art journaling, with the hope of inspiring healing and creativity in those who take them home and utilize them.

 

Maurina’s intention with this exhibition is to advocate for the traumatic brain injury community and their families; to bring awareness of, and to bridge the gap between, traditional and complementary care that is available to those who sustain traumatic brain injury.

 

Maurina will be hosting two artist talks discussing her exhibition and its themes; both are open to the public and free to attend.

Artist talks

Friday, May 27th, 11am – 12pm (online)

Wednesday, June 8th, 2022, 11am – 11:30am (in-person)

We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts

About Canada Council for the Arts

The Canada Council for the Arts contributes to the vibrancy of a creative and diverse arts and literary scene and supports its presence across Canada and around the world. The Council is Canada’s public arts funder, with a mandate to “foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts.” The Council’s grants, services, initiatives, prizes, and payments support Canadian artists, authors, and arts groups and organizations. This support allows them to pursue artistic expression, create works of art, and promote and disseminate the arts and literature. Through its arts funding, communications, research, and promotion activities, the Council fosters ever-growing engagement of Canadians and international audiences in the arts. The Council’s Public Lending Right (PLR) program makes annual payments to creators whose works are held in Canadian public libraries. The Council’s Art Bank operates art rental programs and helps further public engagement with contemporary arts through exhibition and outreach activities. The Council is responsible for the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, which promotes the values and programs of UNESCO to contribute to a future of peace, reconciliation, equity, and sustainable development.

Photo Credit: Elli Hart

Abstract in Baybayin

Title

Solitude of Fortress

Medium

Acrylic and graphite on canvas

We know the challenges our world is facing, and it requires us to be more understanding, compassionate and mindful. Most of all, I believe it’s asking us to be thankful. “Solitude of Fortress”, is my way of expressing how gratitude can transform a fearful and at times lonely situation. It’s asking the audience to contemplate what we’re thankful for when we’re confined in a place where it can be difficult to be in for a long period of time and in a place where joy lives. A place where it wants to connect to its form, to speak to its maker and it conveys belonging even in the darkest times. For light shines within a grateful heart.

Abstract in Baybayin

We know the challenges our world is facing, and it requires us to be more understanding, compassionate and mindful. Most of all, I believe it’s asking us to be thankful. “Solitude of Fortress”, is my way of expressing how gratitude can transform a fearful and at times lonely situation. It’s asking the audience to contemplate what we’re thankful for when we’re confined in a place where it can be difficult to be in for a long period of time and in a place where joy lives. A place where it wants to connect to its form, to speak to its maker and it conveys belonging even in the darkest times. For light shines within a grateful heart.

Collaborations

Title

Between the lines (Helmet Project for True Patriot Love)

Medium

Acrylic, Ink, Gold Metal Leaf on High Density Polyethylene Helmet

In dialogues and conversations, the truth can often be hidden in what is not said and what should have been said. “Between the lines” is an experimental project intending to explore the delicate and undefined space between spoken and unspoken words. This piece also asks the audience to contemplate how we are taking care of the people in service, but more importantly, how are we taking care of one another as a community?

 

The interlay of black lines with white letters symbolizes the confluence of communities in a time of turmoil and uncertainties. The representation of landscape created using the suminagashi technique and rough spray paint is interrupted by clusters of gold metal leaf to materialize the pockets and areas where boundaries get blurred. The helmet is commonly seen as a symbol for physical protection, but here, it is used to prompt questions such as how to safeguard soldiers’ mental health and promote better communication and understanding between different groups within the community.

Collaborations

In dialogues and conversations, the truth can often be hidden in what is not said and what should have been said. “Between the lines” is an experimental project intending to explore the delicate and undefined space between spoken and unspoken words. This piece also asks the audience to contemplate how we are taking care of the people in service, but more importantly, how are we taking care of one another as a community?

 

The interlay of black lines with white letters symbolizes the confluence of communities in a time of turmoil and uncertainties. The representation of landscape created using the suminagashi technique and rough spray paint is interrupted by clusters of gold metal leaf to materialize the pockets and areas where boundaries get blurred. The helmet is commonly seen as a symbol for physical protection, but here, it is used to prompt questions such as how to safeguard soldiers’ mental health and promote better communication and understanding between different groups within the community.

Flow Series

Title

Flow

Medium

Ink on Paper

The Flow image series is created using an ancient Japanese marbling technique called Suminagashi. Sumi means Ink, Nagashi means floating. Originated in 12th century Japan, the oldest example is located in Nishi Honganji, Kyoto. Suminagashi ink is a type of hydrophobic ink used in calligraphy and book binding. It floats on the surface of water and creates interesting patterns.

 

I turned to arts as a complimentary therapy in 2013. Most of my art images presents itself in dreams, which I later express using mixed media, incorporating different art techniques. My hope is to communicate healing with those recovering from trauma. To encourage a greater sense of self-awareness during post-injury, resulting to the acceptance of the present and learning to live in the moment. Each brain injury is unique and with a dash of creativity, challenges can be overcome.

Flow Series​

The Flow image series is created using an ancient Japanese marbling technique called Suminagashi. Sumi means Ink, Nagashi means floating. Originated in 12th century Japan, the oldest example is located in Nishi Honganji, Kyoto. Suminagashi ink is a type of hydrophobic ink used in calligraphy and book binding. It floats on the surface of water and creates interesting patterns.

 

I turned to arts as a complimentary therapy in 2013. Most of my art images presents itself in dreams, which I later express using mixed media, incorporating different art techniques. My hope is to communicate healing with those recovering from trauma. To encourage a greater sense of self-awareness during post-injury, resulting to the acceptance of the present and learning to live in the moment. Each brain injury is unique and with a dash of creativity, challenges can be overcome.

Reflection Series

Title

Reflection

Medium

Ink on Paper

I develop images that help to communicate challenging experiences and healing from trauma. Finding inspiration by examining nature’s lines and textures, my process usually starts with a quick sketch or collage using a variety of materials, cardboard, plastic, dried flowers, leaves, fabric and anything interesting to creatively reuse or recycle. The collaged plates are then sealed, inked up and printed on damp paper. I created part of the Reflection image series using collagraphs, an experimental form of printmaking.

Reflection Series

I develop images that help to communicate challenging experiences and healing from trauma. Finding inspiration by examining nature’s lines and textures, my process usually starts with a quick sketch or collage using a variety of materials, cardboard, plastic, dried flowers, leaves, fabric and anything interesting to creatively reuse or recycle. The collaged plates are then sealed, inked up and printed on damp paper. I created part of the Reflection image series using collagraphs, an experimental form of printmaking.